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I bought my 2001 Corsa C 1.7 DI (Y17DTL) back in dec. 2019. and car is just amazing for my needs and it's quite responsive for its 65hp.

But for the last 2-3 months, I've been experiencing really strange behaviour. Car used to have that "kick" when you cross boost threshold around 2000rpm which was very useful for overtaking and uphill drives (I don't know if it's just turbo or ECU gives it more fuel at that moment). Now, it has that surge of power only when the engine is cold (or so I thought).
What I found out after hours of staring at diagnostic data is that car loses that kick at exact moment that coolant temperature hits 70°C.
It still has turbo power, turbo reaches commanded pressure without any issue, it just loses that "kick" or "power surge" that it had around 2000rpm when it needs it the most (It's just a flat line).

Now for the weird part.
For my test, I warmed up the car to operating temperature (between 85°C and 90°C), tried it, no power. Then, I removed connector from coolant temperature sensor and plugged a resistor in it. When I turned the car back on, diagnostic software reported coolant temperature of around 30°C. I started driving and it drove beautifully! That power surge was back and it was nimble and quick.

So I don't even know if its mechanical or electrical problem anymore, obviously, I can't and won't drive the car with resistor plugged in it instead of a real temperature sensor, I even replaced that sensor even tough I knew it wouldn't fix it, and it didn't. As far as my mechanic and diagnostic software are concerned, car is a 100%, It passed every OPCOM test, every valve and solenoid opens and closes. I'm out of ideas.

If anyone ever encountered this or has any idea what could've caused it, I would be very happy to hear it!

Other things I tired:
I thought maybe it was plugged catalytic converter, so I removed entire exhaust, nothing.
Cleaned the EGR just cause, nothing.
 

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Firstly, it is the turbo spooling up (~1800 rpm) that gives the Di and DTi that surge in acceleration - not the ECU.

It does sound like there may be a problem with the MAF. I have not had a problem, but I remember reading somewhere that, with the 1.7 diesel, a faulty MAF will not give running problems while the engine is cold but, once it warms up, the faulty MAF starts to give false information that affects the optimal mixture for the engine.

The really important thing with the Corsa C is that any sensor you buy (MAF, temperature sensor etc) must be a quality part as originally fitted by Opel. There are so many posts here where the problem is a new sensor that has been bought from ebay or a parts shop/online and the sensor has been made in China and is rubbish. People, of course, think that a newly fitted part must be working properly but it isn't, and a lot of time is wasted by assuming that it works well.

If you do try a different MAF, Bosch ones work properly but they are expensive. It may be a good idea to buy a working, used one to see if that solves the problem. If it doesn't, you have not spent too much and, if it does work well, you can use it while preparing to pay the >€60 for a new Bosch.
 

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Yes, I mean the intake manifold pressure sensor, it goes to the side of the egr between cylinder 1 and 2, with a screw that would almost say behind injector 2, which I remember with the broken flow meter the car was like ain't no tube power, quiet it was fine but when you stepped on it it was as if you did not accelerate so much, and with the faulty pressure sensor the turbo took pressure and released it, took it and released it Regarding brands, discard the Chinese ones, they are bread for today and hunger for tomorrow, try the Pierburg brand, Mercedes uses it well, if you have to report the part, you do it with one more decimal place, if the serial number gives 1.27 the Pierburg reports with a decimal plus 1,275 1,279 etc first step disconnect the flowmeter to see if you notice any improvement
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for quick responses.

If you do try a different MAF, Bosch ones work properly but they are expensive. It may be a good idea to buy a working, used one to see if that solves the problem. If it doesn't, you have not spent too much and, if it does work well, you can use it while preparing to pay the >€60 for a new Bosch.
first step disconnect the flowmeter to see if you notice any improvement
Today, I swapped MAF sensor with working used Bosch MAF taken from another Corsa C and nothing changed. And for the hell of it, I did following:
  • I plugged in a known "iffy" MAF, and it drove terribly (Duh!).
  • I tried driving the car with MAF disconnected, and strangely enough (I don't know if this is expected behaviour), it drove same as it was with last MAF and one I got today.
So if car drove same with MAF connected and disconnected, maybe it still points to some problem around there?

Last thing, MAF sensor that was in my car till today had a part number F00C2G2044, which isn't even listed as part that is to be fitted on Opel (from a quick search),
and the one I got today has the part number F00C2G2030, mechanic that pulled it from another Corsa said that this is it, it's the one that was meant to go on Corsa. Is that right?
 

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The Bosch number for a 1.7Di and 1.7DTi MAF is 0-281-002-180. It is embossed on the side like this example

I don't recognise the numbers you quote. This website (with a very expensive MAF) lists a series of GM (Opel, Vauxhall, Saab) numbers under "details" and "compatible vehicles" lists only 1.7 and 2.0 Di and DTi (also the earlier 1.7TD) but not the CDTi. Be careful that many used part breakers often confuse the CDTi with the Di and DTi - I am quite sure that the MAF for the CDTi is a different part.

If I remember correctly, removing the MAF gives the ECU the same impression as the engine running from cold. If your MAF acts no differently to a removed MAF, I would suspect that there may be a problem with your MAF sending the correct information but if another MAF (from a 1.7 or 2.0 DTi) also acts the same, it suggests to me that the information is not being processed or acted upon correctly. You have, at least, saved yourself the expense of buying a new Bosch MAF only to still have the problem.
 

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The Bosch number for a 1.7Di and 1.7DTi MAF is 0-281-002-180. It is embossed on the side like this example

I don't recognise the numbers you quote. This website (with a very expensive MAF) lists a series of GM (Opel, Vauxhall, Saab) numbers under "details" and "compatible vehicles" lists only 1.7 and 2.0 Di and DTi (also the earlier 1.7TD) but not the CDTi. Be careful that many used part breakers often confuse the CDTi with the Di and DTi - I am quite sure that the MAF for the CDTi is a different part.

If I remember correctly, removing the MAF gives the ECU the same impression as the engine running from cold. If your MAF acts no differently to a removed MAF, I would suspect that there may be a problem with your MAF sending the correct information but if another MAF (from a 1.7 or 2.0 DTi) also acts the same, it suggests to me that the information is not being processed or acted upon correctly. You have, at least, saved yourself the expense of buying a new Bosch MAF only to still have the problem.
Yes, that's the one I got! Numbers I listed are the ones that are directly on the sensor inside housing! 0-281-002-180 is on the housing itself. Disconnected MAF gave a reading of intake temperature being -10C, while airflow still somehow gave me readings (maybe from default ECU values based on throttle) in kPh despite sensor reading of 0V.

I've spent some time reading about car systems, and is it maybe possible that this behaviour has something to do with Open and Closed loop? In nutshell, while cold and warming up, car is in the open loop where it reads sensor data but it does not care about feedback/results and goes off of factory values, and then, as soon as it enters closed loop (70C coolant temp.?) and starts monitoring results, something starts bugging it and it disables that power surge.

It's not a big problem, car is still fine, but knowing that something happened is bugging me very much and it's slowly getting on my nerves. I tried faking fuel temps just so I know I covered most things, that of course did nothing.

Could it be that one of the ECUs/Control modules is just partially faulty and not processing data correctly?

I'm out of ideas, I even started looking around fuel injection pump, but I keep reminding myself that car itself decides to cut power when it hits certain temps, not that some hardware failure makes it fail to deliver results.
 

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And if the sensor reports badly and tells you that there is more temperature and castra for not burning the engine? From diagnosis you can see what temperature the engine has, or it leads me to think that another sensor that measures temperature reports badly and when seeing a hot engine and cold intake it relaxes power due to temperature variation, as far as I know it measures the flow too, and now I come across someone that took into account the outside temperature sensor of the tid, the only solution would be to monitor the values and see when it takes heat which is the one that varies to know where to see it, do not rule out failure of the thermocontact of the fan radiator that also It reports temperature I think, the engine heater box also has a temperature sensor, although I don't think it counts it
 

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And if the sensor reports badly and tells you that there is more temperature and castra for not burning the engine? From diagnosis you can see what temperature the engine has, or it leads me to think that another sensor that measures temperature reports badly
do not rule out failure of the thermocontact of the fan radiator that also It reports temperature I think, the engine heater box also has a temperature sensor, although I don't think it counts it
As far as I know, every temperature sensor that I can read trough diagnostics are reporting fine, I'll look into it what other sensors there could be.

sensor that measures temperature reports badly and when seeing a hot engine and cold intake it relaxes power due to temperature variation.
If you are talking about air intake, wasn't it that car is supposed to run better with cold air? That's why DTI engine has intercooler that cools intake air.
And if you are talking about fuel temperature, I tried faking fuel temps on cold and warm fuel temps, and while it does change performance of the car, it still does not have that kick or power surge at ~2000rpm when coolant temps go over 70C

and now I come across someone that took into account the outside temperature sensor of the tid
It's possible, but my tid temps are correct when checked against current weather condition. and car had this problem in both warm and cold weather.

do not rule out failure of the thermocontact of the fan radiator that also It reports temperature I think, the engine heater box also has a temperature sensor, although I don't think it counts it
I'll look into it, thanks for the advice.
 

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According to mechanical theory if they should work better in cold since the intake sucks cold air, but it is contradicted by being the engine without dilating, in addition the ecu castra power in cold what happens to you is weird, I think the pump also has a diesel inlet temperature sensor, so for these pumps it is not recommended to go much in reserve due to the heating of diesel in the tank, however it is recommended for every 15 liters of diesel in the tank, pour a few ml of two-stroke motorcycle oil to grease the pump and injectors, at least European diesel no longer greases as much as in the years of these cars, try a couple of medical syringes through the filling tank before refueling and I will appreciate it
 
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