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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys :)
Car has blown the head gasket so I'm rebuilding the engine.
I need to lock the crank in place to remove the pulley bolt.
The locking pin is going to be four-weeks from the UK though.
Does anybody have dimensions of the locking pin? I can turn one up in a few minutes myself.
Alternatively, will a half-inch or three-eighths-inch drive extension bar be sufficient to do the trick?
Thanks.
Stay safe!
Larry
 

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Do you not have an impact gun to release the pulley bolt?
Or with sump removed wedge a piece of wood between the crank case and crankshaft?
Guessing you have one of the engines with a timing chain? If so you need to remove the sump to refit the timing cover and to clean the oil pick up tube.
The timing peg hole is not recommended for locking crank to release any bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Do you not have an impact gun to release the pulley bolt?
Or with sump removed wedge a piece of wood between the crank case and crankshaft?
Guessing you have one of the engines with a timing chain? If so you need to remove the sump to refit the timing cover and to clean the oil pick up tube.
The timing peg hole is not recommended for locking crank to release any bolts.
Appreciate the response.

I do have air tools but they're not handy to where I'm having to work on the car, on the farm. It's an electric compressor plumbed into the sheds so I'd have to run 75m of air hose.

Yes, I'm stripping everything out of the block for thorough cleaning.

I did end up poking a half-inch drive extension in the hole and it held the crank fine while I undid the pulley bolt. I'm just looking at the size of the tool and I can't see why they'd make it so hefty except to lock the crank to allow undoing the bolt. If it's just to locate the crank they'd surely have used a length of tube instead of solid rod?
 

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I got a 12V impact driver, around £30, because I have trouble getting air or even mains to do a lot of jobs. It's up against it with the really stuck on stuff, and running the engine helps, but it's a boon for my wheel swaps on the communal car park.
 

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It's cheaper to make round bar than round tube. Even more so when you look at the wall thickness it would need to be in this case. They are only made from low grade stock bar and are quite soft metal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's cheaper to make round bar than round tube. Even more so when you look at the wall thickness it would need to be in this case. They are only made from low grade stock bar and are quite soft metal.
I don't know the purpose of using the crank locking tool though so I don't know how thick the tube wall would need to be. If it's not for undoing any bolts why does it need to be strong at all? The half-inch drive extension didn't retain any marks or bends from its use and I didn't need a particularly long cheater bar to loosen the bolt, only about 600mm. My main concern was damaging the threads in the plug hole, but I have taps to repair that if it had been a problem - it wasn't.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I got a 12V impact driver, around £30, because I have trouble getting air or even mains to do a lot of jobs. It's up against it with the really stuck on stuff, and running the engine helps, but it's a boon for my wheel swaps on the communal car park.
That's a good point and I should get one anyway, there are times when it would be useful to have such a tool in the field.

We're totally off-grid so it's solar and battery storage to run everything, even welding.
 

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I got a VonHaus at £25, but it's probably available in many markets under various brands. I drive my Combo Tour from England to Malaga and the most foreseeable roadside stopper is a wheel/tyre issue that I want to sort and move on quickly from, but once in Malaga I have no chance of running a mains line to the cars. The 12V impact wrench, 12V air compressor and the hydraulic jack are my favourite always takes, but the 12V vac and even a 12V rotary polisher are a bit gutless but better than nothing in the circs.
 

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The torque on the crank bolt is meant to be 150nm + 45 degrees. It is possible your engine has been apart before and the bolt not torqued up tight enough as they usually require some force to undo.
The locking peg is for setting the timing of the engine on reassembly as it is crucial that the crank, both cams and the cam phase disc are all held in the right place for the engine to run smooth.The end of the tool that goes into the crank is a lot smaller than the main body that fits snug in the hole in the crank case (this is only ally anyway) so to make this from tube would require a small bore of around 9mm while the biggest outer part is around 20mm.
s-l300.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
It did require some force, 150Nm is 110ft-lb so I'm guessing it was definitely a lot tighter than that. The engine doesn't appear to have been opened up any deeper than the valve cover gasket, judging by the perfect condition of the bolt heads.

Thanks for explaining that. If I decide I need the pin to set up the crank position sensor I can turn one up on the lathe in a few minutes - 9mm at the tip and a neat fit in the access port. Or I might just order the kit from the UK anyway since I'm probably going to be ordering the rebuild parts from there. These are not very common down here.

You blokes are a credit to this forum, thanks for your assistance.


The torque on the crank bolt is meant to be 150nm + 45 degrees. It is possible your engine has been apart before and the bolt not torqued up tight enough as they usually require some force to undo.
The locking peg is for setting the timing of the engine on reassembly as it is crucial that the crank, both cams and the cam phase disc are all held in the right place for the engine to run smooth.The end of the tool that goes into the crank is a lot smaller than the main body that fits snug in the hole in the crank case (this is only ally anyway) so to make this from tube would require a small bore of around 9mm while the biggest outer part is around 20mm.
View attachment 35920
 

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You will need the cam phase locking tool to be sure it's in the right place. Cam locking tool is just a bit of 5mm flat bar.
These tool kits are silly cheap now on Ebay, under £20. Some timing chain kits come with them but the chains are not that great.
Autovaux and Nevlock are good sellers in the UK that might both ship parts over seas?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You will need the cam phase locking tool to be sure it's in the right place. Cam locking tool is just a bit of 5mm flat bar.
These tool kits are silly cheap now on Ebay, under £20. Some timing chain kits come with them but the chains are not that great.
Autovaux and Nevlock are good sellers in the UK that might both ship parts over seas?
Thanks for the tips. The only drawback just now is shipping from UK is still taking at least four-weeks, sometimes six. Is it worth getting prices on OEM parts from the dealer for these engines? Sometimes I get a pleasing surprise when I find OEM motorcycle parts are way cheaper than expected. OEM stuff should actually be held here in stock though and may be worth paying a bit more to get the vehicle back on the road much sooner.
 

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Some dealer prices are ok but since the PSA take over prices have been rising fast. Not sure if that effects you where you are though?
 

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I've been seeing very stretched delivery estimates here for online ordering, as a covid buttock-covering. In practice, though, they're arriving well before then. There was one exception which took weeks, but I think RM had mislaid that one.
 
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