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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Check your camshaft phase timing is correct. You will need the timing locking tool kit, if you don't have one they are pretty cheap £15/£30.
I'm not sure on the 1.0L 3 potters but on the 4 potter it is possible to fit the inlet and exhaust cams the wrong way and still time it up and it will run with a few problems but no fault codes. Mechanically timing will be the same but the ECU will not understand where cams are in relation to the crank. It will try to fire at/near tdc exhaust stoke not compression stroke. As they run wasted spark they spark on both strokes anyway but only inject on the induction cycle so they still run.
You may also have a slack chain or it could have skipped a tooth. As the cam sensor has shown faults this is where I would continue.
Pretty sure its not that as the fault has slowly degraded and was intermittent, when it has its good moments, it runs fine with plenty of power and efficiency - 55mpg. It would be down on power and run like a mistimed engine.

So last night it ran as usual, this morning it ran terrible, the kangarooing has got really violent, it took two goes to pull away without stalling, and third time it needed clutch slip. It spluttered all the 15 miles to work. I'm looking for a wiring loom as something may be breaking down though that should show as signal intermittent type code. I'm going to re-fit the old coil pack and possibly crank sensor then wait for the code reader to show up.
 

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If the timing is mechanically correct but electronically out as i described they can run ok with intermittent errors so do not dismiss the possibility it could be wrong.
Have you checked the ECU plugs and earth points yet? were they all ok?
Intermittent faults are normally electronic, a component failing or a loom breaking down or a bad connection. Hard part is finding it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
If the timing is mechanically correct but electronically out as i described they can run ok with intermittent errors so do not dismiss the possibility it could be wrong.
Have you checked the ECU plugs and earth points yet? were they all ok?
Intermittent faults are normally electronic, a component failing or a loom breaking down or a bad connection. Hard part is finding it.
ECU plugs and earths next to check cheers! I'll not dismiss anything completely, the three pot is going to be very different though regards timing phasing and it's not wasted spark or I doubt it very much.

Last Vauxhall I had, had a dizzy...
 

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Before opening distribution I would try to reinforce masses, to the cylinder head and cam cover, in Astra G they had a reinforcement from the front to the cylinder head that the corsa C lost
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Only found two earths, one by battery - battery neg to chassis and another on the bellhousing, both were clean, but they got polished up and refitted.
ECU connections opened, perfectly dry and clean, no corrosion, no green fur - absolutely fine.

Still running absolutely rubbish, unless you drive at 4000 rpm upwards.
 

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Most Vauxhalls of this period ran wasted spark as it's easier to control over single spark.
There are 2 or 3 earth wires for engine on a metal plate above the bellhousing, looking straight down from the coil pack plug.
Also there are other earth points on the front of the L/H chassis leg some models had 2 point here and others just 1. You may only see them from looking up from below or with front bumper off. (no need to take bumper off to get to them though)

As it runs with the new cam sensor plugged in but not fitted it does seem odd it will not run once fitted? This suggests there could be a fault in this area? Are you able to read any live data for the cam sensor?
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
What does live data for the EGR show?
No idea, old reader has only managed to extract one code, new reader still not turned up - possibly irrelevent now...

The kangarooing got more violent yesterday on way home, it's struggling to pull away, juddering unless using 3000 rpm and a lot of clutch slip, cutting out happens every 30-40 seconds requiring quick on/off with the key to keep moving, I also think there is a new ticking noise.
It will run cleanly in the region 6000-7000 rpm.

I've been told these three potters like to blow head gaskets between cylinders, is this a thing that you have heard about? Would possibly explain the problems.

I think this Corsa's days are numbered, soon to be recycled...
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Last chance saloon...I attacked the corsa today.

Convinced that the head gasket is leaking across the pots I made a leak down tester, there are no leaks, its all fine.

Noticed the cam chain seemed a little slack? Never dealt with cam chains on a car engine before, is it tensioned by a spring or oil pressure?
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Cams were timed ok though.

After a lengthy fit when I didn't unbolt the EGR pipe, I eventually got the intake off, it's pretty grim inside

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Then the postie turned up with my second hand engine wiring loom as I still think its an electrical issue, whilst taking the loom out I got to this connector

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Which had this burnt out pin
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Maybe this is the cause of the problems? Hope so.

The new loom had a slightly different connector with heavier gauge wire and bigger contacts, maybe there was a known issue?
Because the two connector wont mate, I'm just going to solder the wires together
 

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That burnt pin will cause random faults. It looks like the body to engine electric plug? It supplies 12V to ECU and other sensor circuits, coil, injectors, purge valve etc.
If you can use crimp connectors to re join the wire and heat shrink after. Much better than solider in automotive applications.
The timing chain is both spring and oil tensioned and yours is well past its best before date! you should hardly be able to lift it off that top plastic guide with finger pressure let alone get 4 fingers under it!
Inlet manifold is standard like that as it's not been running right for a while.
 

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It's fairly straight forward, kits with a timing tool start at around £80 but you still need a sump gasket, down pipe gasket, water pump gasket (possibly a water pump and thermostat) oil and filter.
You will also need a decent jack and a pair of axle stands as you have to remove the engine mount.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
All fixed - running sweet :)

Either it was in the loom that I replaced or more likely it was down to that burnt out contact pin.

Happy days!

As it may now be a keeper I changed the water pump, washed the engine bay, cleaned the interior, cut the very faded blue paint and black dyed all the plastic, its looking pretty damn good.

It's fairly straight forward, kits with a timing tool start at around £80 but you still need a sump gasket, down pipe gasket, water pump gasket (possibly a water pump and thermostat) oil and filter.

You will also need a decent jack and a pair of axle stands as you have to remove the engine mount.
I've tried googling for a decent how to guide and led to a lot of dead links but sure I read that in contrast to what Haynes might say, there's no need to drop the sump? Which would negate need for downpipe gasket, sump gasket, oil and filter??

Obviously it means I've got to take the engine mount and water pump off again, no big deal.

All I'm thinking for the cam chain is to remove cover and tensioners and chain, put on new one - there's talk of special tools but surely cant be that tricky? (I've rebuilt a lot of engines in the past) but only ever bike engines with chains and they are typically crank out jobs.
 

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You do need to remove the sprockets which on assembly you need the locking tools to hold the phase ring and cams correct alignment to the crank which also gets locked.
You can do it without removing the sump only then you run the high risk of damaging the oil pump as you refit the timing case. Also the only way to clean the oil pick up tube out is to remove the sump. It also makes removal of the oil bypass valve a lot easier with the timing case bolted to the engine as the cap plug is usually very tight. Sump gaskets are cheap even for OEM ones with down pipe gasket its under £20.
I got all the parts from Autovaux on a 1.2 with oil and coolant and all GM or OEM parts it came to £150.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 · (Edited)
You do need to remove the sprockets which on assembly you need the locking tools to hold the phase ring and cams correct alignment to the crank which also gets locked.
You can do it without removing the sump only then you run the high risk of damaging the oil pump as you refit the timing case. Also the only way to clean the oil pick up tube out is to remove the sump. It also makes removal of the oil bypass valve a lot easier with the timing case bolted to the engine as the cap plug is usually very tight. Sump gaskets are cheap even for OEM ones with down pipe gasket its under £20.
I got all the parts from Autovaux on a 1.2 with oil and coolant and all GM or OEM parts it came to £150.
Thanks.

Here it is after a bit of a tidy up, the bonnet is half done to see the contrast but I'm sure you are all familiar with faded vauxhall blue
36215
 

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In the mechanics cycle we study that an engine with a chain is changed by opening the old one, hooking the new one and rolling the engine, once the new one has passed and you removed the old one, you close the new one and that's it, logic leads you to think about count how many links the new chain has and how many the old one just in case, anyway many engines fail the chain tension skates, so you still have to change it too, as a data try not to change the oil density in changes that do not suit the tensioner very well
 
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