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Yep, but I was surprised how noticeable it was returning to a more std 45 from the 55 (on 16s; prior to that it had 185/55/15s). It wasn't exactly sluggish, but it lost something quite similar to when I was driving in 32+C Malaga and the little intercooler was struggling. Not like back to the Di days, but enough to know things weren't optimum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #442 ·
The Combo

Earlier this year I made a few more upgrades to the van. The first (and possibly my favourite) modification was a new metal gear shift knob, made by a company called Richbrook, specifically to fit Vauxhall cars. Fitting it was so simple even I didn't have any issues!



To me, it looks and feels much nicer. I also bought a tiny little hat from Etsi to keep it warm in winter :D



So, in light of trying to make the van nicer to drive, next on the list was more sound insulation to make the cross-country journeys a little more tolerable, and some carpet to improve the look. I started by stripping all the ply boarding to be greeted by a nasty mess.





Next I stripped all the plastic, which was a simple case of undoing a few screws and yanking the trims out. Using a lot of all-purpose cleaner, a few brushes and some old towels I managed to make a heck of a difference!











I then used more dacron to fill the gaps in the chassis to deaden some of the tyre roar.



Using the same methods as before, I cleaned all the plastic trims, and replaced them.







Next was the part that would make the biggest difference, visually at least. The plywood floor had a lot of ingrained dirt and a small amount of mould, so I gave it a quick belt-sand before putting a layer of self-adhesive foam on to add a small amount of cushioning to the floor.



I then used more of the same 4-way-stretch carpet to cover the panels before laying them down. They looked much better.







Unfortunately I then ran out of carpet after covering the wheel arch panels, so I had to put everything back together. Still, the van looked much more professional than before.



The van was certainly quieter. Though I must admit the difference wasn't as big as I expected. Still, anything's an improvement on what it was. I did add more carpeting later, will cover in an upcoming post.
 

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Nice; I remember a few years back you saying the Combo was a tool rather than a jewel but they do grow on you (well, me) enough to spend a little on - especially to make a little more comforting. I like the Richbrook stuff, was tempted by a handbrake handle some time ago though the griffins conflict with my Opel Blitz, but I did get their seatbelt leather wraps (used bargain, of course) and will find some suitable way to Opelize them. Also, I'd like a bit of soundproofing - I much prefer mine quite loaded than clanking around unloaded. Even the 5-seater has that harsh sound. Informative that you didn't get as much deadening as you hoped, I'll bear that in mind. Also, nothing unusual about the load area. Rust Locker on his YT vid took his rear bumper and plastics off and I seriously asked him if the previous owner sold loose muesli from the back of it. They must be grot magnets, those floorpans.
 

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Discussion Starter · #444 ·
Nice; I remember a few years back you saying the Combo was a tool rather than a jewel but they do grow on you (well, me) enough to spend a little on - especially to make a little more comforting. I like the Richbrook stuff, was tempted by a handbrake handle some time ago though the griffins conflict with my Opel Blitz, but I did get their seatbelt leather wraps (used bargain, of course) and will find some suitable way to Opelize them. Also, I'd like a bit of soundproofing - I much prefer mine quite loaded than clanking around unloaded. Even the 5-seater has that harsh sound. Informative that you didn't get as much deadening as you hoped, I'll bear that in mind. Also, nothing unusual about the load area. Rust Locker on his YT vid took his rear bumper and plastics off and I seriously asked him if the previous owner sold loose muesli from the back of it. They must be grot magnets, those floorpans.
Supposedly the most effective way to sound-deaden is using dodomat but it adds so much weight and can get quite pricey. The weight put me off more than anything, especially when mine's a 2-seater. covering the whole back in the stuff would add a silly amount of weight, and would not help mpg for sure. Dacron foam are definitely a more cost-effective way to improve it without adding too much weight. It would probably help to put some of that 4-way stretch carpet over the inner wheel arches too but I never thought of that while it was all apart.
 

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I was thinking of sound-deadening under the cab carpet but you're right, it is pricey and I kind of don't mind the diesel lump once I'm on the move. I have also considered Chineebay extra door rubber because the rear doors in partic and the slider and front cabs rubbers (not at all perished looking) don't seem super insulating on the exterior noise front. The clankiness of the load area is probably the most annoying, though. A crew cab rear carpet is £14-18 but I suspect little improvement (I do have the pull across 'parcel shelf' roller vinyl but that's just to keep prying eyes off and has ~0 sound insulation) and fibre in the metal gaps is probably the single biggest rattle reducer.
 

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If what you want is to try a strip of soundproofing from the discarded cars, they will give it to you and thus test if it convinces you before spending anything, it is my turn to soundproof the 3 brake light in the trunk and I will have to try
 

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Discussion Starter · #447 ·
The Combo

Summer 2021

Over the course of the year I had started several little projects to improve the van's long-distance capabilities, such as carpeting and sound insulation. Another was the seats. The originals, while in very good condition, had no real comfort or support, so I looked into replacing them. I didn't want full leather seats as they would be too hot in Summer, and too cold in Winter. I also wanted something that looked the part, too. In the end, I found exactly what I wanted.

Browsing Ebay, I found a pair of Recaro front seats from an early 2000's Astra GSi, thankfully half leather, as opposed to the optional full leather items. At around £175, they were fairly cheap, but rather messy.


Starting with the passenger seat, I cleaned it up ready for fitting...


Whilst the old passenger seat was out, I lifted up the carpets to clean underneath, which had its share of ingrained dirt.

They were an absolute nightmare to fit. Other posts on the facebook groups suggested only one hole would need re-drilling, but in the end the other three also needed widening. Eventually, with my Dad's help, I got the passenger seat fitted.

With hindsight, I probably would have just looked for a pair of Tigra seats, which are a direct fit. However, the Recaros did look fantastic once in. It was a few months before we got the chance to tackle the driver's seat, but eventually, we got that fitted too.

This time, I cleaned the seat after fitting. My method is fairly simple; I spray on a generous helping of Bilt Hamber Surfex HD, agitate with a drill brush, and then draw it out with the vacuum cleaner.


With that done, I cleaned the rest of the interior for the end result.

I also rewarded the van with a long-overdue wash...

Unfortunately the bumper grills are missing as you can see. Another perk of the crappy Ebay front bumper. I've got some replacements ready to fit once I get around to booking that bumper to be correctly colour-matched.

September 2021

At the tail end of the Summer, I found some time to carry on with carpeting the van out. I removed both of the side sheets of ply, stuck on a layer of thin self-adhesive foam, and wrapped them in carpet. I didn't get photos along the way since it's fairly self-explanatory, but the van looked much more professional with the sides done. I was tempted to insulate behind the ply lining with dodomat, but I was trying to avoid adding too much unnecessary weight, so settled for stuffing more dacron foam wherever I could.

The last piece of the puzzle was the sliding door trim, which took a bit more finesse thanks to the small recessed part where the door handle sits. Two extra holes also had to be cut at the bottom for the mounting screws.



Refitting took a bit of manhandling, especially with the ply panel above, not to mention all of the carpeting adding a bit of width to the panels, so the plastic fasteners fit even more snug. Once in however, it looked very nice.

Last on the list was to tackle a very common issue with the Vauxhall Combo; condensation. The inside of the roof gets completely sodden with water on a chilly morning, so I had to figure out some sort of roof insulation. I went with thick self-adhesive foam pads, which were impossible to cut straight, so it looks a bit tatty, but at some point I'll make up some kind of roof lining to go over it.

With that done, my little NVH crusade is just about done. It's still by no means a quiet vehicle to travel in, but it's certainly an improvement on what it was, and it looks much, much better to boot. The seats have also helped a little as well, though they are a little hard on longer journeys. The old workhorse is really coming along nicely now, and that's us up to date on the Combo, too! Any future posts on the Corsa, Combo or Volvo will be present day.
 

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Ah, so you got those GSi seats (you know me, no ebay item passes by without me noticing). I did think they'd be a nice Combo front, but I lose patience very quickly on a slopey drive so I would have got very sweary very quickly. Much better that you put the effort in, and that Bilt Hamber has done wonders - note to self. Once a 'workhorse' Combo gets used for long treks, it's funny how comfort-spending gathers appeal. I find the Exclusiv/Tigra leathers are good for me at very long distances but I don't use it in UK winters and, actually, it's not a big problem in Malaga summers. Being 3dr seats, I tip them forward when it's parked up and that keeps the glare off them. Even if they are quite hot at first, I find they dissipate the excess heat quicker than cloth over foam which can hold it a lot longer in my Modus. That said, Mrs Oz' bare legs could leave actual salt marks so I got a cheap black towelling ebay cover (1-piece incl headrest) for August. Are your seats lower now or did you transfer them to the Combo runners with their raised blocks?

Also, I think some other fripperies are on there that you might not have mentioned? Metal interior handles - and I don't remember you writing up the headlights, though my memory might have slipped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #449 ·
Ah, so you got those GSi seats (you know me, no ebay item passes by without me noticing). I did think they'd be a nice Combo front, but I lose patience very quickly on a slopey drive so I would have got very sweary very quickly. Much better that you put the effort in, and that Bilt Hamber has done wonders - note to self. Once a 'workhorse' Combo gets used for long treks, it's funny how comfort-spending gathers appeal. I find the Exclusiv/Tigra leathers are good for me at very long distances but I don't use it in UK winters and, actually, it's not a big problem in Malaga summers. Being 3dr seats, I tip them forward when it's parked up and that keeps the glare off them. Even if they are quite hot at first, I find they dissipate the excess heat quicker than cloth over foam which can hold it a lot longer in my Modus. That said, Mrs Oz' bare legs could leave actual salt marks so I got a cheap black towelling ebay cover (1-piece incl headrest) for August. Are your seats lower now or did you transfer them to the Combo runners with their raised blocks?

Also, I think some other fripperies are on there that you might not have mentioned? Metal interior handles - and I don't remember you writing up the headlights, though my memory might have slipped.
I did mention the lights a few pages ago, post #416. I would have mentioned the silver door handles about 2 years ago.
The GSi seats sit very high (on original runners), frankly a bit too high. The bulkhead cage limits how far back you can slide them so you can't really straighten your legs much, hence why I perhaps should have found some Tigra seats. The interior trim behind the door also limits how low you can put the GSi seats since they're wider.
 

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Oops, I read this thread each update and normally have a good memory for forum posts; my apols. Perhaps your sig pic with the old lights is responsible for my lapse. I used the Exclusiv's runners, which lost me the Combo's risers at the rear and I had to ditch the (detachable) front risers. It's only a 2-3cm drop, but feels much more because of the high windscreen. I like sitting low, as in the X1/9, but I'm quite keen for a cheap Tigra passenger seat that would have the (not very effective but better than nothing) seat height adjuster that Cs don't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #451 ·
The Corsa Automatic

The Exhaust

You may remember that I removed the stainless steel ASBO pipe from my project Corsa and polished it recently.

Well, I advertised it on Facebook, and managed to score £90 for it! A standard cat-back system cost me £60 on Ebay, which turned out to be slightly wrong. Turns out manuals and automatics have a different oil sump, so the exhaust is different underneath it. Thankfully the old section underneath the sump was still there, so Shaun managed to cut and shut the new system onto that. I must admit, I don't very much care for the flaccid penis look the exhaust exit seem to emulate, so I may cut the bend off and shove a chrome tip on.


Most recently I also did some cleaning under the bonnet. It was fairly grubby, so I put some effort in. I first rinsed the engine bay, coated all of it in 'GUNK' engine degreaser and Bilthamber Surfex HD and attacked it with an assortment of brushes to agitate all the grime. After another rinse, I coated the plastics in a water-based plastic dressing while still wet, and dried the lot with an old microfibre towel. I cleaned the engine cover separately and also removed the throttle body to give it a clean out (though I forgot to get photos of that).


It's by no means perfect, but it's a lot more presentable. Katherine took it out for a test drive with all this done. Against the Clio, the comparison is a trade-off;
-The Corsa's EPAS has no feel or resistance. It's very easy to steer but doesn't inspire confidence at first. The Clio is hydraulic (seems to only be an option for automatics and Renaultsports, standard models had EPAS), which has much more feel and weight, though it does self-centre quite violently. One point to the Clio.
-The Clio is more comfy, hands down. It's not even a competition. The Corsa is perfectly acceptable when you compare it to what people drove decades ago, but the Clio is miles ahead.
-The Corsa doesn't roll as much, which is helped by the lower seating position. You sit on top of the Clio by comparison, and boy does it lean.
-The Clio's wing mirrors are hopeless. Elf's big ears certainly help.
-The Corsa's slushy American style torque converter trumps the Clio's. You have no idea what gear you're in, and that's a good thing. The Clio does not shift smoothly, even with a torque converter.
-Looks. The Corsa just looks better.
-Ease of maintenance. The Corsa easily wins here. The engine bay is much bigger, and the biggest trump card is the timing belt, which doesn't run the water pump (that runs on the auxiliary belt). That means changing the timing belt is cheap! On the other hand, the Clio's belt runs the water pump, and thanks to limited space, it takes twice as long to change. That's around £150 in labour depending on where you go, plus the added cost of the water pump. It's also worth noting that the Clio has had its share of electrical gremlins, and common faults include misfires, complete wiring failure of the rear lights, and it's only a matter of time until the head gasket fails. Most of the Corsa's common faults relate to the chain-driven manual gearbox models.
-Lastly, safety. It's a bit of a grey area, but if you've ever spent any time on Clio forums or facebook groups, you'll be shocked how many get written off. Granted, teenage drivers play a part, but they all oversteer. The back end just goes without warning. The Corsa by comparison is more stable, and when you drive the two cars, it feels it.

So, a trade-off. Katherine did not like the Corsa's steering, but preferred the mirrors and the flatter ride. Reliability played a part, too, so she's decided to take the Corsa on! So, we'll be selling the Clio!

In other news, I sold the Astra wheels. So, the running total expenditure;
-I paid £700 for the car.
-I sold the exhaust for £90, and paid £60 for the replacement, along with £15 for fitting, bringing the total to £685.
-The Astra wheels sold for £110! Meanwhile, the black wheels and tyres that went on were technically free.
With that, my total expenditure is £575. The car is paying itself back!
 

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I have EPS on my Modus, which is much closer to the Clio 3 than your Clio 2 and the feel is often terrible. Despite good visibility, I park and reverse it like a chump because at low speeds it weaves massively with minor movements. Fine at highway and even 30mph driving, though. Another huge downside (I did read that yours is hydraulic) is that the Modus/Clio 3 column, if it goes, has to be programmed on replacement. As Renault clones are far less common and understood than Opcom, this can be a £300 total. The car is undriveable without it so there are "power steering fault" used ones that people won't buy at any price. The C is a £65 DIY plug and drive. Electric gremlins and their PITA fixing is a Clio minus (I've been lucky) and cheap used parts for the C are abundant whereas Modus (and Clio 3 bits that go in) used stuff is listed at silly prices that no-one pays but just gets relisted at the same price. I have today just ordered a decent used leather gear knob, gaiter + plastic fitment for £10 posted from a dismantler, which is a rare result. Not a fair comparison, but my Modus bay is like an overstuffed lunchbox to work in. The cabin is a lot nicer, but I wouldn't say that so much of the 2.

you're not getting the cheap chrome tip again? After you got yours last time, I put one on my Modus (flaccid exit pipe but still looks much better even pointing down) and on the Tour. Bargain, and not ridiculously fake looking from moderate distance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #453 · (Edited)
The Clio

Time to go!

A few weeks ago, Katherine tried the Corsa Automatic, and agreed to take it on. Probably more for my sake than hers. That means the Clio finally has to go! So, I had to clean it, MOT it and advertise it.

The MOT certainly had my stomach in my throat. We expected no issues, since Shaun had already looked around underneath and found everything in excellent condition. However, what we didn't expect was the emissions test failure. Turns out the catalytic converter was borderline, and it took a fair few attempts to pass. Trust the Clio to troll us with one last parting gift! Anyway, after that, it was plain sailing, and the car has a fresh ticket. I got the oil and filter changed at the same time and then set about preparing the car.

I started with a bloody good hoover. After two years with us, the car wasn't exactly filthy, but was definitely in need of a clean.








I then moved on to the engine bay. I did a fairly simple job since it wasn't bad at all, rinsing the engine, coating it in degreaser, agitating with brushes and rinsing again. I applied some plastic shine and dried it with an old towel.

Then it was onto the exterior, which after a year without being washed, certainly needed some attention. Before I could even wash it, I had to rinse out all the panel gaps, spray some all purpose cleaner in, and agitate with a brush before rinsing again. I then washed it, treated it with tar remover, ran over it with a clay towel and gave it a quick machine polish and also tried to polish up the headlights. Here's the before and after.










Once all finished, the Clio proved to have stood up to the test of time fairly well, though it clearly hasn't had a difficult life compared to some Clios I've detailed.

All cleaned up, the car was up for sale for £1400. It's a little high for the age of the car, sure, but the auto gearbox certainly drives prices up, and you'd struggle to find another this spotless at the same price. I must admit I won't miss the car, not one bit. Any MkII Clio that isn't a 2.0 RS or a V6 is simply a means to an end, and even then it's not a very good one. We found a Clio that was better maintained than most, and it still proved more problematic than the Vauxhalls that my family has owned over the years; cars that have a reputation for falling apart when you look at them funny.

Selling it took a little while in the end. I had one viewing, they went away and never got back in touch, I had a few offers of £1000 which I declined, and one offer of £700 which I politely told to sod off. In the end a local guy looked at the car as a first car for his daughter. He asked about the cambelt and I was honest and told him I have no idea if it's been done, and we agreed on £1200 so he can budget getting that replaced, which was more than fair enough. £1200 was my target all along!

As it stands, until I get the Corsa serviced, replacing the Clio with it makes us about £600 better off! Can't say no to that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #456 ·
The Corsa

A Year of Neglect

My Corsa is crap. I am under no illusions that in every measurable way, it is an atrocious car. Without rear seats or a big engine to weight up the springs, the ride will kill you. It's noisy. The lacquer peel has made it look like a chronic eczema patient. It's 0-60 time has been measured since single-celled organisms ruled the world and it still hasn't got there yet. Even the fuel economy of 50mpg average leaves something to be desired in a 3-cylinder hatchback that weighs less than 850kg.

But, I adore the little heap. It's my first car! I've had it since 2013. Driving it puts a smile on my face, because at 55mph on a twisty A-road, it feels like you're doing 100mph. So, I can't bear to get rid of it. Besides, you couldn't pay someone to take it away.

Anyway, it's generally been well-looked-after, serviced yearly, and anything that needed doing, got done, as you can see looking back through this thread. However, when I last went to Shaun to have the bumper realigned (I'll show photos in a bit, they're not very good), he found one of the rear springs was broken. They were 40mm lowering springs, but they hadn't done much at the rear since it was all stripped out, so I decided it was finally time to go down the route of coilovers.

Coilovers

The thing that had always put me off coilovers was the sheer amount of choice, and variation in price. It was impossible to know where to start, and everywhere I asked I rarely got informative answers. I wanted to get a set with adjustable shocks, figuring that I could set them to their softest setting to compensate the lack of weight, while still keeping the ride height low. I also wanted a set that wasn't going to fall apart in a year or two, so I was leaning away from the cheaper options like JOM or Prosport.

I'd heard good things about Spax from a few people, and their RSX coilover set had adjustable shocks, so I bit the bullet and paid the £650 or so for the set. It arrived, and looked very smart indeed, with shocks finished in yellow, and springs in red. I booked it in with Shaun, and his new employee got the old Amax springs and Bilstein B4 shocks off. I only got photos of the rear as I had to disappear off to do some odds and sods.

Behind all the mud, the Bilstein shocks were still in very good condition, so I figured I'd keep the rears as spares for Elf (the automatic Corsa). The fronts meanwhile, will go on the Combo at a later date. The new coilover set fitted easy enough, and looked very smart once on. I know the rear axle looks terrible; it's still quite solid, I will get it grit blasted at some point.

Once all fitted, I was very excited to try these fancy, expensive new bits.

Arising problems

I took it out for a drive, only to find it felt terrible. I went back to Shaun, and we realised that his employee forgot to adjust the shocks (he didn't know how as it turned out). We found they were at setting 2/4, with 1 being hardest and 4 being softest. We cranked all four corners to the softest setting and I tried it again. The ride was still unbelievably harsh, particularly at the rear. The worst part was the clattering. It was so loud I genuinely didn't feel safe pushing the car any faster than your average pensioner would hustle their Peugeot 2008 down the road.

We couldn't figure out what on earth caused the noise until the next time I visited, a few weeks later, when Shaun jumped in the boot while I drove. He held onto the tops of the shocks where they bolt through the inner wheel arch and found they were the cause of all the noise and harshness.

I had a load of spare rubber bungs and washers from my original shocks, as well as the Bilstein B4 items, so we tried fitting a few combinations of them to see if it was some sort of metal on metal contact. Convinced that the shock absorber couldn't possibly hit anything external, we tried it again, and found no improvement at all. I was quite honestly a little dejected at the idea of spending all this money to make the car objectively worse. Because this had all happened over several bookings, I no longer had the luxury of sending the kit back within 14 days, plus I'd already paid the labour to fit it all.

Anyway, since we knew it was the rear shock absorbers causing the bulk of my issues, we tried re-fitting the Bilstein shocks on the back. The car was transformed. Still by no means comfortable, but all the clattering was gone, and the rear end was so much more compliant. On the Spax rear shocks, it genuinely felt like the rear wheels weren't touching the ground over some of the harsher bumps.

Anyway, text wedge over. Here's how the Corsa looked on the old lowering springs, and with the sagging front bumper. Note the panel gap under the headlight.

And here's how it sits on the new coilovers.


As you can see, the poor thing was in dire need of a damn good clean, after over a year without being washed. The first thing I did was spray some Surfex HD in all the panel gaps and agitate with a detailing brush. Then, the lower portions of the body were soaked in TFR, the car was rinsed, given a thorough wash with lots of elbow grease, rinsed again, treated with tar remover, rinsed, decontaminated with a clay towel, and rinsed again, before being dried. Since the paintwork's quite far gone, I didn't bother polishing, though I did break out my SPTA mini polisher to clean up the headlights, which definitely needed attention.




I also had a quick go at some of the paintwork where the lacquer had peeled off. I managed to bring a decent shine back into the small patch I polished. Note how dull it is on the left compared to the right as the reflection of the tree across the road is cut off.

Anyway, once the car was all done, it looked a lot more presentable.


It was great fun bringing the Corsa back up to a decent standard, and I think I shall be spending a bit more time on it in the coming months. Probably.
 

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Discussion Starter · #457 ·
The Van

Chavved!

Over the last few months, I've been planning a few changes to the Combo which, for one reason or another, got delayed. Recently, I finally got one ticked off the list. I lowered it! With a Combo, it's easier said than done, mainly because finding the right springs can be a bit of a nightmare, particularly in the case of the rears.

There's conflicting information on Corsa and Combo pages on just what goes low and what doesn't, but the general consensus is that Astra G rear springs all fit. Hatchback springs slam the rear end but keep the soft ride, Estate springs lower a little bit, or apparently not at all in some cases, and Bertone springs get some kind of middle ground. Figuring that I never carry much weight, I gave the hatchback springs a punt. For the cost of £20, why not?

The front was a simpler affair, because it's exactly the same as a Corsa. You may also remember that I recently had Spax coilovers fitted to the Corsa, and I had the old Bilstein B4 shocks and 40mm lowering springs for the front end.

First, I cleaned up the spring and shock, and then ordered new suspension top mounts, since the originals had worn out, causing a loud grinding noise during compressions. I also ordered a coilover sock to try and preserve the springs.

So, I took the Combo to Shaun's and he got to work. It was a very simple job, seeing as we were literally replacing one shock assembly with another. The contrast was stark between the two.

While all this was being done, the track rod ends also needed replacing, which only took a few extra minutes,

Whilst Shaun was getting all that done, I replaced the oil pressure switch, which is a common fault I had been meaning to get around to.

We then got the van on the floor, which looked hilarious. We had to check the tracking before anything else, but once that was done, I could take the van outside and appreciate my life's choices. Here's the before...

And here's how the mule looks now...


Naturally, I was not expecting the van to be that low. Admittedly, it looks the absolute business, and it's pure luck how level it sits front to rear. I also never fully appreciated the weight difference between petrol and turbodiesel engines until seeing this spring compressed so low on the van, compared to how the Corsa used to sit.

My first thought was "bloody hell, can I even drive it?!" Naturally the first thing to do was test drive it. The industrial estate where Shaun's unit is situated is rife with potholes and oversized speed bumps, so I figured they would be a good test. Amazingly, I didn't bottom out once, which was reassuring. The ride also wasn't too negatively affected. The grinding noise was also gone, too. Unfortunately, I did have to remove the coilover socks due to rubbing, so we'll try fitting them differently at a later date. I've decided to live with it a while and see how the van behaves in day-to-day life. The most notable thing is the rear is still very soft, while the front is quite firm. I guess the upshot of that is the front end feels flat and darty while the rear being so soft means it stays planted and stable. Speed bumps are odd, though. The front end reacts and the rear doesn't, which is quite funny.

Either way, it looks very cool in my childish eyes.
 

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That is only a gnat's armpit lower than I would like, visually. My ideal would be to see the full circle of the tyre but no ugly gap above, while a truncated tyre doesn't look good to me and makes me think I'll need a repeat prescription for Anusol. I'll be interested in your updates on ride and comfort. Although my rear coils were replaced (std) as soon as I bought it, who knows what horrors are happening as it sits unused on my front lawn for the past 18 months and I may have a day of reckoning when spring comes and I can travel more freely in it.
 
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